The blogsphere is riddled with folks that argue that blogging will kill off journalism.  Slagging off the NYT is hip.  

Like Nicholas Carr, I’m not convinced

My good wife is a  journalist by profession, and now a  blogger of domestic bliss, Germany and literature.  She was a crime reporter on the streets of Johannesburg in the  early 1990′s.   She had a tough job, but the toughest part of the day was dealing with the editor.  He would take copy that he felt was badly written or researched and destroy it.  In a movie he could be played by a hybrid mashup composite  of Charles Bronson, Clint Eastwood, Russell Crowe with  a telephone and Lynne Truss.

Jason Wood pointed the irregular mailing list  to the article here on Venture beat.   Auren Hoffman wrote it. He is the CEO of a start up.

Big companies are losing their “A” players and they’re struggling to attract “B” players. In an industry where everything is about people, large tech companies are in trouble because they are losing the talent war

 Jason’s response is here..  He politely demolishes the post.  He has more patience than I do.  

Businessweek covered this issue sometime ago, and they do the normal journalistically boring things like interviewing people and studying market statistics…

 There is something ironic in this quote from Businessweek

While the Internet leaders snatch up top tech talent, that creates headaches elsewhere. Some startups, for instance, say the talent drain has made their own hiring more difficult. Joe Kraus, a co-founder of early portal Excite and now the CEO of collaborative software startup JotSpot, says Google has been especially tough to go up against. “If you’re talking to someone great, they’re invariably talking to Google, and they often have an offer.”

Ask Joe who he works for now.

If Venturebeat and peers are  the new newspapers, then I think they need to hire an editor. 

 

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