Tombstones and social software as literary forms.

A significant portion of my job looks at the impact of social software on organizations, especially the HR related space.  Make no mistake, social software is making a impact on HR processes, whether HR departments get it or not. Some do some don’t.  There is a lot of innovative stuff going on, and I hope to see more HR departments using it. And twitter is one of those tools that can play a role in modern HR collaboration.

Anyway, on a lighter note,  I’m most impressed with the complete works of Shakespeare on twitter.  (hat tip JP)  my favourites:

Merchant of Venice. MoV: A greedy lender loses out due to a poorly-phrased contract, women practice law in drag & w/out licenses, and lovers are united.

Henry V HV: Bad-ass Henry V kicks France’s butt with a rag-tag army, many long-bows, and excellent speeches. Henry then marries a French princess.

MacBeth M: Kingship is just not in the cards for an ambitious and superstitious Scotsman.

Hamlet  H: Mommy issues are just the beginning for a prince with a murdered father and new Uncle/Step-dad. Most everybody ends up dead.

For those of you on Facebook, Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice  as a Facebook group is  unmissable.

Yes, these are a lot of fun. 

Composing and reducing ideas in to 140 characters or less is not always easy, but constraints are not always detrimental. Powerful constraints often create powerful results.

The constraints of the tombstone size mean that Epitaphs have to be relatively short.  This doesn’t weaken their poignancy, but strengthens it.

image

(from wikipedia)

Go tell the Spartans, stranger passing by
that here, obedient to their law, we lie.

Simonides‘s epigram at Thermopylae

Constraints can be goodness.  In decades to come, a very very very very small  portion of tweets will be revered as much as an e.e.cummings poem. My tweets won’t! But in the meantime it is a very good way to stay connected and meet interesting people.

  You can follow me here.

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